BLUE LAGOON

In an International beauty member newsletter, I recently read about a product called Blue Lagoon Hydrating Cream Broad Spectrum SPF 30, which is apparently THE waitlist worthy product to try!

What? Really? I’m not buying this. It says, “Contains minerals, geothermal seawater, and silica, direct from the Blue Lagoon in Iceland,” and claims benefits that are supposed to “protect and strengthen the skin’s barrier function” while also “minimizing the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles”! Wow, that’s quite a mouthful. I don’t think I’m buying this in a 50ml tub for $89.

The Problem
There is no such thing as natural or organic geothermal seawater. The geothermal water from the Blue Lagoon is the excess water from a nearby geothermal plant that is pumped into a lava field right outside the plant. Secondly, this “magic cream” seems to do too many things at the same time, and in my book, its claims are so extravagant that I simply don’t trust it.

The Fix:
First of all, the International Skin Care Sales Manager for Blue Lagoon Iceland should know the difference between features and benefits and not make claims that might not even be true, as they aren’t supported by clinical studies—at least, not any I could find.

Secondly, do your research before entering the international market with regard to what claims are acceptable and what claims are not, as they vary wildly from Europe to the US.

Thirdly, I’d like to suggest that the BL management stick to what they know best, which is catering to tourism, something they’ve managed very successfully for over 10 years.

Also, I find it super sad that the Blue Lagoon has completely lost its focus on the root mission, which has always been to help people who suffer from psoriasis and severe eczema.
If you have time, dig deep and you’ll find the true story of the Blue Lagoon.

What do you think?

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